Steve Jobs: The Most Important Thing

“When you grow up, you tend to get told that the world is the way it is and your life is just to live your life inside the world, try not to bash into the walls too much, try to have a nice family life, have fun, save a little money.

That’s a very limited life. Life can be much broader, once you discover one simple fact, and that is that everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you. And you can change it, you can influence it, you can build your own things that other people can use. Once you learn that, you’ll never be the same again.

And the minute that you understand that you can poke life and actually something will, you know if you push in, something will pop out the other side, that you can change it, you can mould it. That’s maybe the most important thing. It’s to shake off this erroneous notion that life is there and you’re just gonna live in it, versus embrace it, change it, improve it, make your mark upon it.”

via Farnam Street

Integrated care and support – Seeking Pioneers

SCIE, together with other national health and social care agencies, has pledged its commitment to supporting better integration.
Care minister, Norman Lamb, announced the initiative which aims to make joined-up and coordinated health and care the norm by 2018 – with projects in every part of the country by 2015.

The Department of Health is looking for pioneers that will work across the whole of their local health, public health, social care, local authority and voluntary sectors, to achieve and demonstrate the scale of change that is required. Pioneers will be supported by the national agencies that have joined the National Collaboration on Integrated Care and Support.

SCIE will work with our partners to build on our existing areas of expertise including understanding factors that help or hinder integrated working; developing and delivering effective multi-agency safeguarding and integrated end of life care; and sharing examples of good practice.

For more information:

SCIE press release
Department of Health press release
Integrated Care: Our Shared Committment
Integration pioneers
SCIE’s integration resources

Government publishes Care Bill

Via: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-publishes-care-bill

The Care Bill introduces legislation to provide protection and support to the people who need it most and to take forward elements of the government’s initial response to the Francis Inquiry.

The bill covers three areas:

1. Reform of care and support

2. Response to the Francis Inquiry on failings at Mid-Staffordshire Hospital

3. Health Education England and the Health Research Authority

For more information please access the following links:

NHS Commissioning Board equality, health inequalities and human rights strategy development webinar 12 March


If you would like to find out about the development of the national strategy for equality, health inequalities and human rights there is a free lunchtime webinar taking place Tuesday, March 12, 1-2 pm. To deliver a truly great health and care service for everyone the NHS Commissioning Board must focus on the promotion of equality and the reduction of health inequalities. This includes listening to the voices, views and perspectives of people from all backgrounds, including those who are socially disadvantaged and from protected groups. The session will focus on putting patient and public voice at the heart of the strategy.

The panellists are: 

Paula Vasco-Knight, National Equality Lead, NHS Commissioning Board

Professor Steve Field, Deputy Medical Director – Health Inequalities, NHS Commissioning Board

Ruth Owen OBE, Chief Executive of Whizz-Kidz, a charity that gives disabled children the chance to lead a more independent life.

Roz Davies, Co-Director of Altogether Better a partnership organisation that works to engage and support people and communities to have a more empowered relationship with health. Roz is currently on secondment as the Project Lead for Citizen Voice at the NHS Commissioning Board.

The webinar intends to support participants to:

§ Improve understanding of how people’s differences can affect their experiences of health and care, the quality of care they receive and their health outcomes.

§ Find out how they can make sure that people from protected groups and socially disadvantaged communities are listened to and have the opportunity to shape health and care services and workplaces.

§ Learn about the principles behind meaningful engagement and about the potential of people feeling more confident, connected and in control of health.

§ Hear about the development of the national strategy for equality and reducing health inequalities – and find out why listening and focusing on what matter most to patients is an integral part of this.

If you would like to attend- email edc@nhs.net to be sent joining instructions. To join the webinars you will need a telephone to dial in, and if you are sat at a PC you may also choose to view slides and ask questions/make comments.

 Further information on the webinar  

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MAJOR DECISION MADE ON THE FUTURE OF HEALTHCARE IN NORTH WEST LONDON

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The Joint Committee of Primary Care Trusts (JCPCT) has today (19th February) made a decision on the future of NHS services for approximately 2m people living in NW London.

The Committee agreed with all the recommendations put forward by the

 

 

‘Shaping a healthier future’

programme following public consultation. This will mean:

 Investing over £190m more in out-of-hospital care to improve community facilities and the care provided by GPs and others. Most of these improvements will be put in place before any major changes to local hospitals are made.

 

 The five major acute hospitals with a 24/7 A&E and Urgent Care Centre will be: Chelsea and Westminster; Hillingdon; Northwick Park; St Mary’s; and West Middlesex.

 

 Central Middlesex Hospital will be developed in line with the proposed local and elective hospital models of care, and will also include a 24/7 Urgent Care Centre.

 

 Hammersmith Hospital will be developed in line with the proposed local and specialist hospital models of care, and will include a 24/7 Urgent Care Centre.

 

 Both Ealing and Charing Cross Hospitals will be developed in line with the proposed local hospital model of care, and will each include a 24/7 Urgent Care Centre. The JCPCT also recommended that further proposals for these two hospitals are developed in future by the relevant CCGs.

 

The ‘Shaping a healthier future’  programme was established to address a number of challenges being faced by the NHS in NW London, including the demands of an increasing, ageing population. There are more people with long term conditions, and unacceptable variations in the quality of care, evidenced by higher mortality rates for patients treated in hospital at night or during the weekend.

Following extensive public consultation, the JCPCT was asked to approve the 11 recommendations made in the ‘Shaping a Healthier Future’  Decision Making Business Case, as well as two further recommendations which refer to additional proposals for Ealing and Charing Cross hospitals (see notes to editors, below).

Taking into account all of the evidence, the JCPCT has accepted all of the recommendations. These proposals will now take 3-5 years to implement, ensuring that improvements in out of hospital care are in place before major changes to hospital services are then implemented.

 

Jeff Zitron, Chair of the JCPCT, said:
“This is an important decision for the NHS in NW London. I am delighted that, after thorough and careful examination, we are able to fully recommend what clinicians feel will deliver the best possible care for local people for years to come. We have not taken this decision lightly, and have been very careful to consider the many thousands of responses we received during our extensive consultation last summer. I am confident that this is the best decision for the people of North West London and for the NHS.”

Chief Executive: Anne Rainsberry Chair: Jeff Zitron

Dr Mark Spencer, Medical Director for Shaping a healthier future and Ealing GP, said:

“This decision will save lives and improve care dramatically for the two million people living across North West London. I am pleased that the JCPCT agreed that this was the best decision for a clinically safe, high quality and financially secure future for all the hospitals and NHS trusts in North West London. There are urgent and pressing needs to make these changes. If we do nothing people will continue to die unnecessarily and services will fail.”

 

END

 

NOTES TO EDITORS

 

1. For media enquiries

 

Please contact Luke Blair 07779 023188 or Sarah Garrett 07736 297245

 

2. Recommendations before the JCPCT (the Decision Making Business case)

 

The recommendations are included in the recommendation paper which accompanies the Decision Making Business Case (DMBC). This paper outlines the decisions that need to be taken by the JCPCT about the future shape of services in NW London. The programme has followed a robust process to develop a shared vision of care, evaluate different options, consult the public and stakeholders, develop and analyse recommendations, create a benefits framework and plan implementation.

The DMBC has been reviewed by the Programme Board, Clinical Board, Finance and Business Planning Group and other committees and groups established by the JCPCT to provide it with advice and recommendations. The JCPCT’s decisions will be enacted through Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) and the NHS Commissioning Board contracts and agreements over the medium term.

A full copy of the DMBC can be found at www.northwestlondon.nhs.uk/shapingahealthierfuture.

>

The recommendations included in the DMBC are as follows:

 

1. To agree and adopt the North West London acute and out of hospital standards, the North West London service models and clinical specialty interdependencies for major, local, elective and specialist hospitals as described in Chapter 7 of the Decision Making Business Case (DMBC).

 

2. To agree and adopt the model of acute care based on 5 major hospitals delivering the London hospital standards and the range of services described in Chapters 7 and 9 of the DMBC should be implemented in North West London.

 

3. To agree that the five major hospitals should be as set out in Chapter 10 of the DMBC: Northwick Park Hospital, Hillingdon Hospital, West Middlesex Hospital, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital and St Mary’s Hospital.

 

4. To agree that Central Middlesex Hospital should be developed in line with the local and elective hospital models of care including an Urgent Care Centre operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week as detailed in Chapters 7,9 and 10 of the DMBC.

 

 

Chief Executive: Anne Rainsberry Chair: Jeff Zitron

 

5. To agree that Hammersmith Hospital should be developed in line with the local and specialist hospital models of care including an Urgent Care Centre operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week as detailed in Chapters 7,9 and 10 of the DMBC.

 

6. To agree that Ealing Hospital be developed in line with the local hospital model of care including an Urgent Care Centre operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week as detailed in Chapters 7,9 and 10 of the DMBC.

 

7. To agree that Charing Cross Hospital be developed in line with the local hospital model of care including an Urgent Care Centre operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week as detailed in Chapters 7,9 and 10 of the DMBC.

 

8. To agree that the Hyper Acute Stroke Unit (HASU) currently provided at Charing Cross Hospital be moved to St Mary’s Hospital as part of the implementation of resolutions 1, 2 and 3 above and as described in Chapter 6 of the DMBC.

 

9. To agree that the Western Eye Hospital be moved from its current site at 153 – 173 Marylebone Road to St Mary’s Hospital as set out in Chapter 10 of the DMBC.

 

10. To recommend that implementation of resolutions 1 to 7 should be coordinated with the implementation of the CCG out of hospital strategies as set out in Chapters 8 and 17 of the DMBC.

 

11. To recommend to the NHS Commissioning Board and North West London CCGs that they adopt the implementation plan and governance model in Chapter 17 of the DMBC.

 

12. The JCPCT commends the further proposals that Ealing CCG has developed for the Ealing Hospital in response to feedback from consultation. The JCPCT recommends that Ealing CCG and all other relevant commissioners should work with local stakeholders, including Ealing Council and Healthwatch, to develop an Outline Business Case (OBC) for an enhanced range of services on the Ealing Hospital site consistent with decisions made by this JCPCT. This OBC is to be approved by the SaHF Implementation Board before final submission.

 

13. The JCPCT commends the further proposals that Hammersmith and Fulham CCG has developed for the Charing Cross Hospital in response to feedback from consultation. The JCPCT recommends that Hammersmith and Fulham CCG and all other relevant commissioners should work with local stakeholders, including Hammersmith and Fulham Council and Healthwatch, to develop an Outline Business Case (OBC) for an enhanced range of services on the Charing Cross Hospital site consistent with decisions made by this JCPCT. This OBC is to be approved by the SaHF Implementation Board before final submission.

 

3. The ‘Shaping a healthier future’ programme

 

The ‘Shaping a healthier future’ programme was launched in January 2012 with the publication of the Case for Change. It was taken forward by eight clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), made up of GPs representing NW London’s eight primary care trusts (PCTs).

They have worked with hospital doctors, nurse leaders, providers of community care such as mental health services, social services, patient and volunteer groups and charities to develop the proposals for change. These proposals and their vision for the future of healthcare in NWL are set out in the Consultation document and all of the evidence and

 

Chief Executive: Anne Rainsberry Chair: Jeff Zitron

 

work that has gone into developing these proposals is set out in the pre-consultation business case.

The programme has four medical directors:

 Dr Mark Spencer, medical director of NHS NW London and a GP in Ealing

 Dr Susan La Brooy, former medical director of Hillingdon Hospital and a consultant physician in acute medicine and care of the elderly

 Dr Mike Anderson, medical director of Chelsea and Westminster Hospital and a consultant gastroenterologist

 Dr Tim Spicer, chair of Hammersmith and Fulham Clinical Commissioning Group and a GP in Hammersmith

 

4. NHS North West London

 

The North West London (NWL) Cluster was formally established on 1 April 2011 and is the largest commissioning cluster in London, with an annual health budget of £3.4bn and serving a population of around 1.9 million.

It operates across eight boroughs: Brent, Ealing, Hammersmith & Fulham, Harrow, Hillingdon, Hounslow, Kensington & Chelsea, and Westminster. There are eight Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) with local GP leadership operating in shadow form across all eight boroughs.

For the purposes of the

Shaping a healthier future

consultation, three neighbouring boroughs – Camden, Richmond and Wandsworth – were included in many of the activities and associated communications since health services there are also likely to be affected by the proposals.

 

 

5. The Joint Committee of Primary Care Trusts (JCPCT)

 

The programme is overseen by the JCPCT, made up of voting representatives from the eight PCTs in North West London (NHS Brent, NHS Ealing, NHS Hammersmith and Fulham, NHS Harrow, NHS Hillingdon, NHS Hounslow, NHS Kensington and Chelsea and NHS Westminster). It also includes voting representatives from the three neighbouring PCTs affected by the proposals (NHS Camden, NHS Richmond, and NHS Wandsworth). The Chair is Jeff Zitron who is also chair of the NHS North West London Cluster Board

Influencing local commissioning for health and care: guidance forthe voluntary and community sector

Via: The King’s Fund library, 11.02.13

This guidance is intended to support the voluntary and community sector in understanding and influencing health and wellbeing boards. It gives an overview of health and wellbeing boards, joint strategic needs assessments and joint health and wellbeing strategies and the role of the voluntary sector.

·         Regional Voices – news

Health and Social Care Act explained

Via: H&F LINk newsletter, 11.02.13

A series of factsheets on the Health and Social Care Act 2012 explain particular topics contained in the Act, including its key themes. They include case studies of the policy in action, or answer frequently asked questions about the topic.

The factsheets were first published in October 2011 and have since been updated to reflect the changes made during the Act’s Parliamentary passage

See http://www.dh.gov.uk/health/2012/06/act-explained/ for more information.

Providers input to Health and Wellbeing Boards recommended

Health and wellbeing boards should take advantage of the experience and connections of established healthcare providers but be open to contributions from new ones if they want to improve the health outcomes of their communities, according to new report.

The publication, which draws on the experience of local authorities, health providers and commissioners, advises that boards should tailor their engagement programme to local priorities, using different tools and models at different times, rather than fix rigidly on one structure or process.

Stronger together: how health and wellbeing boards can work effectively with local providers, says health and wellbeing boards are unlikely to produce a comprehensive Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA) or successfully deliver a Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy (JHWS) unless they involve and engage local providers.

Outlining the benefits for health and wellbeing boards’ engagement with providers, the report says health organisations can contribute valuable local knowledge and insights, helping to identify shared priorities for JHWSs that are achievable and relevant for local communities.

It also explains the significant contribution which provider engagement can make to service integration. By developing strong, interactive engagement with providers rather than interfacing with them solely on a contractual basis, the report claims, health and wellbeing boards can effect an integrated approach to service delivery.

It further warns that if boards do not make use of the opportunity to engage with providers to understand and influence service delivery, a prime chance to lead and drive integration across the whole system will be lost.

Laid out in the report is a 12-point framework for building health and wellbeing board and provider engagement. Elements include:

  • Involving providers in determining engagement approaches, to ensure they work for the wide variety of size and type of provider
  • Using informal peer to peer relationships, which can be as effective as formal mechanisms for engagement and involvement
  • Establishing sub-committees, time-limited working groups and appointing provider representatives rather than offering permanent membership to so many providers that the health and wellbeing board becomes unwieldy
  • Supporting the development of links between providers and local Healthwatch, to facilitate local communities’ and service users’ opportunities to get their voices heard.

Jo Webber, interim director of policy at the NHS Confederation, said: “Over the past year (with funding from the Department of Health) we’ve produced a toolbox of resources to support newly-established health and wellbeing boards.

“With this latest publication, all the learning and advice from those with direct experience of engaging with health service providers – from big acute trusts, community service providers, and voluntary sector organisations – is being shared throughout the system, so the new boards can make use of the best tools for their local needs.”

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